The Dyslexic Advocate

Published by
Austin Area Branch of The International Dyslexia Association®
Founded in Memory of Samuel T. Orton

Taken from: Noevmber 2004 Edition     http://home.austin.rr.com/aabida/      helpline (512) 452-7658       

The International Dyslexia Association neither recommends nor endorses any specific speaker, school, institution, instructional program or material.

Click here to view Fall 2003 Newsletter

Contents

Are YOU Reading to Your Child?

President’s Note

THANK YOU

AABIDA’s ANNUAL DINNER and MEETING

NEW IDA INDIVIDUAL RATES

Please share your e-mail address!

WELCOME New Members of AABIDA

 

Are YOU Reading to Your Child?

Dena Crook, M. Ed., CALT-QI

Texas State University

Are you reading to your child? Research shows the importance of reading to children from birth on.  However, for a child with a reading disability, being read to on a daily basis is imperative!  Stanovich (1986) coined the term “Matthew Effect” which is a term taken from the Gospel of Matthew.  Stanovich writes about the rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer in relation to reading development.  You may ask what does this have to do with reading to my child.  Those children who have reading disabilities are often reading text below their grade and intellectual levels.  In addition, reading disabled children’s energy is often focused on reading the words accurately and fluently.  Because the text is below their cognitive level, they are not keeping up with the vocabulary and world knowledge that their on-grade level peers are being exposed to.  In essence, children with reading disabilities will have deficits in vocabulary and world knowledge concepts because many of the texts that they are able to read are below these children’s intellectual level.  Therefore, those who are reading on or above grade level are building stock and accumulating a wealth of concepts while those who read below grade level are operating on a deficit.

One Part of the Solution: Read to your child!  It is important for you to set aside a time daily where you read anything (e.g., book, magazine article, newspaper) that reflects your child’s intellectual level and interests. Reading daily to your child will increase your child’s vocabulary.  In addition, listening comprehension and reading comprehension are highly correlated (Aaron, 1994).  The same sorts of processes that we use when reading material to understand are very similar to the same sorts of processes we use when we listen to understand.  By reading to your child and helping him/her to think about and engage him/herself into what he/she is listening to, you are helping your child to practice skills and strategies that he/she can use when reading and comprehending text on his/her own.

No matter the age of your child, find the time to read to and engage your child in the text. Here are some different ways that you can engage your child as they listen to you read:

v    Before Reading:

·        Talk about the title of the text and what it could mean.

·        Talk concepts that your child may already know about from looking at the title or cover of the text. For example if you are going to read Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss, you may ask your child what he/she knows about eggs.

·        If pictures, captions, and, or graphics are in the reading, explore and discuss what these could mean without reading anything.

v    While Reading

·        Talk about some of the words that may be unfamiliar to him/her.

·        Have your child predict what he/she thinks could happen. Have the child tell you why he/she made that prediction. Then you give your prediction.

·        If you are reading a story, discuss who the characters are, the setting, the problem and the solution as you read.

v    After Reading :

·        Have the child evaluate the text. Did he/she like it? Why or Why not? Then you evaluate the text.

·        Together paraphrase or summarize what was read. Can you do it in 10 sentences or less?

Reading to your child everyday will help to ensure that your child is building vocabulary and world knowledge concepts while strengthening your child’s ability to think about what is being read. So ask yourself, “Have I read to my child today?”

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President’s Note

Dear AABIDA Members,  

I would like to thank each of you for your dedication and support of the dyslexic population.  Your membership to the International Dyslexia Association is vital for continuing research, legislation, and support of dyslexia.    

If you would like to volunteer to assist us in any conference, program, or activity, please call our helpline at (512) 452-7658, and a volunteer will return your call.

Sincerely,

Sharon McMichael

2004 AABIDA President

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THANK YOU

Thank you to those of you that attended the various 22 events that were hosted by the Austin Area Branch of the International Dyslexia Association during October 2004.  These events were in accordance with IDA’s proclamation and Governor Perry’s proclamation of October 2004 as “Dyslexia Awareness Month”.

And, thank you to Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic-Texas Unit for co-hosting two Open Houses with AABIDA at the RFBD-Texas Unit.

Also, thank you to those volunteers and speakers that dedicated their time and efforts in providing these free events to the public.

Finally, thank you to Governor Rick Perry and his staff for their help and cooperation in educating the Texas public about dyslexia.  

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AABIDA’s ANNUAL DINNER and MEETING
Saturday, January 29, 2022 at 5:30 P.M.

at the Old Pecan Street Cafe
310 E. 6th Street

(between Trinity and San Jacinto)

$25.00 per person (this includes a choice of one of the four entrees, tea, dessert, and gratuity.)  

Click here for printable registration form

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NEW IDA INDIVIDUAL RATES

IDA has new individual membership rates that are effective on Jan. 1, 2005 .   Individual membership will increase to $70.00 per year.  For further information, please visit IDA’s web-site at:     www.interdys.org

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Please share your e-mail address!

As we increase our efficiency, we have moved to e-mail communication.  Our branch  e-mail address is for distribution of information to our membership.  So, please share your e-mail with IDA at:          [email protected]

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WELCOME New Members of AABIDA

Diane Abernathy, Linda Brown, Zandra Clay, Bonnie Ensor, Angela Gutierrez, Gayle Kahaneh, Paula McDevitt, Doug  McDonough, Lynn Pohlmeier, Kim Raibourn, Raymond Roberson, Jeanne Schaefer, Kendra Shaffer, Susan Werner, Nora Wilson, and Velda Wyche.

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If you’d like to be more involved with the Austin Area Branch of the International Dyslexia Association, please leave us a voice message on our helpline at (512) 452-7658.

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The International Dyslexia Association neither recommends nor endorses any specific speaker, school, institution, instructional program or material.

Austin Area Branch of the International Dyslexia Association
Local Austin Area Helpline (512) 452-7658 ---

Call our volunteers for:

  1. Membership application blanks and basic information packet
  2. Teacher training information
  3. Referral lists for: